Category: Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs)

HeartSine Wins Prestigious Management Award

HeartSine, the developer and manufacturer of life-saving AED units, won two prestigious awards for management in 2014.

“It’s a great honor for our highly experienced, hard-working management team to be recognized by such a prestigious organization–especially for our international success,” says Declan O’Mahoney, CEO of HeartSine Technologies. “Our global expansion is a direct result of the team’s commitment to excellence, innovation and quality.”

Annuvia is a proud partner of HeartSine, acting as the West Coast Premiere Partner, responsible for managing sales in the western 8 states. If you’re interested in learning more about partnership opportunities for your AED sales business or if you’re interested in learning more about HeartSine AEDs, you’re at the right place. Give us a call to see if we can help! (866) 364-7940

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Awareness of AED Units Leads to Use

While by no means scientific, we’re increasingly seeing “evidence” that general AED awareness promotes AED lay rescuer usage. And, as we know, using an AED increases the likelihood of saving a victim in SCA. In a recent story in Phoenix, there were two saves in 24 hours. One save occurred at a show and another at an ice rink, both due to the efforts of quick-thinking bystanders. Bystander use of AEDs is very encouraging, as it leads us to believe such action can be replicated in other communities across the country.

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New Study Shows Importance of PAD Programs

We all know that AED units save lives. We all know that time is of the essence. So, how often are AEDs used during a rescue? A new study out of England suggests that AED units are only retrieved and applied to victims before EMS arrives 1.74% of the time, a rate, according to the authors, as “disappointingly low.”

In a separate study, out of Canada, researchers identify that less than 1 in 4 cardiac arrest victims had an AED within 100 meters of the sudden cardiac arrest incident. The average, according to this 5-year study, indicates that AEDs were available, on average, within 300 meters.

What do a “disappointingly low” deployment of AEDs during a rescue and AEDs located too far from victims have in common? The fact that they both offer evidence that we need more AEDs in communities around the world!

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What’s the Difference Between the Samaritan 300P and the New 350P?

By now, as I’m sure you’ve noticed, HeartSine only sells and ships the HeartSine Samaritan 350P  PAD AED unit. The 350P is the latest make and model from HeartSine to receive 510k clearance for shipment in the United States. The 300P is the “older” model, shipped prior to November, 2013. The 3ooP and the “new” 350P look almost identical, so what’s the difference between the two?

Well, the short (and not so fascinating answer) is that there are very few differences. According to HeartSine’s 510k clearance letter for the 350P, the differences include:

  • Addition of CPR coaching prompts
  • CPR metronome and complies with the AHA’s 2010 guidelines
  • Larger capacity battery, which leads to a longer standby life
  • More intuitive LED
  • refined arrhythmia algorithm
  • Saves more data, when turned on and operational
  • Logging of additional types of event information
  • Addition of new, FAA-approved Pad-Pak

So there you have it! According to this author, the main thing to note is that this shows HeartSine’s commitment to continually advancing and innovating their product line. If you’d like to learn more about the 35oP, see a demo, or place an order, let us know. We’d be happy to help!  Visit our HeartSine store to learn more.

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Four Compelling AED Program Must Haves

Annuvia released a list of “Four Compelling AED Program Must Haves” this afternoon. Check out this list as you’re sure to be impressed with how our technology is leading the way in the Automated External Defibrillator industry in more ways than saving lives due to sudden cardiac arrest.

Included in our list, Arch offers AED program managers new e-commerce methods to re-order accessories, obtain AED medical oversight from leading physicians, and automatically file mandatory 911 and EMS AED placement reports.

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Arch’s New AED Map Display Offers More than Directions!

Internationally mapping AED units with real-time location-specific feedback is changing the way AED program managers track their AED unit readiness programs. Large national AED program managers, ultimately responsible for overseeing their firm’s Automated External Defibrillator (AED) unit’s readiness checks, can now use one, user-friendly screen to visually see the status of all of their equipment, internationally, by using the Arch system from Annuvia.

Arch, Annuvia’s new AED Medical Direction and Oversight program, allows AED owners of all sizes to track their AED units through a user-friendly dashboard. AEDs are color-coded and literally placed on a geo-coded map, with satellite imagery, so that AED owners can quickly check the status of their program.

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Mississippi State Board of Dental Examiners Adopts AED Mandate

According to Board Number 45, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, the Mississippi State Board of Dental examiners adopts a new Automated External Defibrillator (AED unit) mandate for dental offices. Regulation Number 45 reads:

“Effective July 1, 2012, all dental offices in the State of Mississippi shall be required to have a minimum of
one (1) properly functioning Automated External Defibrillator (AED), or equivalent defibrillator, on the
premises of each dental office. Each AED, or equivalent defibrillator, shall be maintained in a properly
functioning capacity at all times. Proof of the availability of a properly functioning AED, or equivalent
defibrillator, shall be made available for review at any time by any member of the Board or by any
designated agent of the Board.”

Let us know what you think!

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Healthy Schools: Wellness & AED units

Many column inches in the daily newspapers have been devoted lately to increasing the nutritional value of the food offerings in our public schools. Like it or not, nearly all of America’s students eligible for free or reduced school lunch programs now eat both breakfast and lunch at school. Effectively, the American taxpayer is responsible for two thirds of the students’ daily nutrition. This is a significant charge for all of us and the fact that we are not doing very well by these children and young adults was recognized recently by 250 nation wide “eat-ins.” In many areas these well organized slow food events did encourage people to think about the possibility of offering more local, fresh ingredients to our students on a daily basis. Certainly, wellness is a topic deserving mush more media attention. Unlike reactive solutions like prescription drugs, emergency treatment options, and health insurance overhauls, or preventative techniques like health screenings, cholesterol testing, or colonoscopies, wellness is a solution to train individuals to make positive, transformative, life-altering decisions – forever.

But what of a more pressing and immediate health issue; that of sudden cardiac arrest, an interruption in the normal heart rhythm, taking the lives of 7,000 to 10,000 school children each year. What about an organized heart-in in which cardiac screenings, CPR training, and AED Defibrillator instruction would be available for all student athletes? Of course a healthy diet is desirable, but a healthy heart is much more immediately necessary for any student engaging in vigorous physical activity.

Why limit CPR and AED training to the adults in charge of youth sports? The students themselves are much more likely to work out with peers on and off the field, thus far more likely to be closer to a victim in a sudden cardiac emergency than is the coach or referee or even the paramedic assigned to the event, if there is one.

Preparedness could easily be as much a part of sports training as are the ubiquitous push ups and crunches. The audience is already there and willing to be instructed. Because of the nature of the leisure time activities in which this age group engages, the idea of using an AED device is a natural and not to be feared. There exists a huge untapped resource of potential life savers today in our own schools. Train them to save lives today and continue to work toward providing them healthy nutrition in the longer run.

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Annuvia Launches International AED Consulting Practice

SAN FRANSISCO, CA – While AED defibrillator units (Automated External Defibrillators) are growing in popularity on an international basis, organizations have few opportunities to hire global consultative services to help with AED unit selection and implementation. Purchasing an AED unit in the United States is typically easy and can even be done over the internet. To ensure regulatory compliance, owners merely need to monitor local laws that commonly contain elements such as CPR/AED training requirements, maintaining AED unit prescriptions, and properly documenting AED unit “readiness” checks on a 30-day basis. International deployment, however, can be much more challenging.

“Organizations of all sizes across the country have done the right thing in acquiring AED units for their offices,” states Micah Bongberg, President of Annuvia, a national provider of CPR, AED and First Aid training services, “but they’re finding it increasingly difficult to provide the same level of care for their employees who are located at their international locations.”

Global businesses realize that sudden cardiac arrest doesn’t just happen in the United States, yet the maze of import and export laws, coupled with the unique differences in AED-related statutes from countries across the world, make doing the right thing difficult.
“Rather than accepting the status quo and only providing life-saving protection for an organization’s domestic employees, Annuvia has elected to add a new practice, focused on providing International AED Consulting services to businesses of all sizes. Our hope is to help large, global businesses navigate the maze of international regulations, in an effort to help them implement system-wide programs – for all of their employees,” states Bongberg.

Annuvia’s International AED Consulting practice will offer several customized service offerings, including: negotiating with international AED distributors, preparing quotes and ordering equipment, conducting virtual site assessments, ensuring customs clearance, and researching CPR & AED training requirements as well as country-specific AED-related laws on their clients’ behalf. As a distributor for the leading AED unit manufacturers and national provider of CPR/AED and First Aid training services, Annuvia is able to offer a unique, first-hand perspective that is currently non-existent for large, global organizations.

To learn more about Annuvia’s new International Consulting Practice, contact Annuvia at: info@annuvia.com

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Healthy Schools: Wellness and AED units

Many column inches in the daily newspapers have been devoted lately to increasing the nutritional value of the food offerings in our public schools. Like it or not, nearly all of America’s students eligible for free or reduced school lunch programs now eat both breakfast and lunch at school. Effectively, the American taxpayer is responsible for two thirds of the students’ daily nutrition. This is a significant charge for all of us and the fact that we are not doing very well by these children and young adults was recognized recently by 250 nation-wide “eat-ins.” In many areas these well organized “slow food” events did encourage people to think about the possibility of offering more local, fresh ingredients to our students on a daily basis. Certainly, wellness is a topic deserving mush more media attention. Unlike reactive solutions like prescription drugs, emergency treatment options, and health insurance overhauls, or preventative techniques like health screenings, cholesterol testing, or colonoscopies, wellness is a solution to train individuals to make positive, transformative, life-altering decisions – forever.

But what of a more pressing and immediate health issue; that of sudden cardiac arrest, an interruption in the normal heart rhythm, taking the lives of 7,000 to 10,000 school children each year. What about an organized “heart-in” in which cardiac screenings, CPR training, and AED Defibrillator instruction would be available for all student athletes? Of course a healthy diet is desirable, but a healthy heart is much more immediately necessary for any student engaging in vigorous physical activity.

Why limit CPR and AED training to the adults in charge of youth sports? The students themselves are much more likely to work out with peers on and off the field, thus far more likely to be closer to a victim in a sudden cardiac emergency than is the coach or referee or even the paramedic assigned to the event, if there is one.

Preparedness could easily be as much a part of sports training as are the ubiquitous push ups and crunches. The audience is already there and willing to be instructed. Because of the nature of the leisure time activities in which this age group engages, the idea of using an AED device is a natural and not to be feared. There exists a huge untapped resource of potential life savers today in our own schools. Train them to save lives today and continue to work toward providing them healthy nutrition in the longer run.

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